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Schedule & Speakers – Summer Seminar 2017

p. rydellDr. Patrick J. Rydell is the Founder and Director of the Rocky Mountain Autism Center, Inc. and Autism On Call, LLC, in Lone Tree, Colorado. With more than 35 years of practice (“on the floor”) in the field of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), he has provided international and national training, workshops, consultations and program development to government agencies, medical facilities, universities, school districts, professionals and families. His doctorate (University of Nebraska - Lincoln) was earned through a National Institute of Health Leadership in Autism grant (1989) and he has a double master’s degree (Southern Illinois University Carbondale) in speech pathology and special education with a program emphasis in early childhood and autism spectrum disorder. He is also a U.S. Fulbright Senior Specialist Grant recipient (2005). Dr. Rydell is the co-author of the SCERTS Model (Prizant, Wetherby, Rubin,Laurent & Rydell, 2006) and author of the Learning Style Profile for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (Rydell, 2012).Dr. Rydell has also co-authored 5 book chapters and numerous peer-reviewed research articles on topics related to autism spectrum disorders.  Dr. Rydell is a MedBridge instructor for professional continuing education in ASD. 

Course Description

Many families want their children with ASD to have conversations as an early priority for classroom intervention and therapy. So, how do we best prepare our children to have these successful conversations in school? Should we wait until late primary or middle school years to begin this intervention process, or start early?

Social-communication interactions in early childhood are the same as conversational interactions as adolescents, but at a higher developmental level. We need to understand how to connect these dots. As speech-language pathologists, we need to be effective, efficient and practical as we teach our children “to talk about what they know”. The Learning Style Profile for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (Rydell, 2012) approach incorporates our understanding of the core challenges and learning style differences of children with ASD. This knowledge helps us teach our children a learning style that allows them to take advantage of the social-communication cues and models available in the classroom so that they can understand how and when to communicate and eventually hold genuine conversations. Our children’s learning style should assist them with how to initiate, maintain and respond to others during social interactions without being prompted or scripted by adults. This presentation will assist speech-language pathologists with how best to prepare our children to be successful in conversations. In addition, we will discuss the developmental progression from early childhood to adolescents regarding the foundations of conversation and its relationship to core challenges and learning style in children with ASD.

Learner Outcomes

  1. The learner will be able to provide 5 practical applications of LSP Components in order to prepare the child for successful social interaction with peers.
  2. The learner will be able to provide 5 practical applications of LSP Components in order to prepare the child for successful communication interaction with peers.
  3. The learner will be able to provide 5 practical applications of LSP Components in order to prepare the child for successful conversational interaction with peers. 

Agenda

Registration: 8:00 – 8:30
Presenter: 8:30 – 10:00
Break: 10:00 – 10:15
Presenter: 10:15 – 12:00
Lunch: 12:00 – 1:30
Presenter: 1:30 – 3:00
Break: 3:00 – 3:15
Presenter: 3:15 – 4:45

Professional Level: Intermediate

Financial Relationship: Rocky Mountain Autism Center. USU Speaking Fee. 
Relevant non-financial relationships - none.

r. stoeckelRuth Stoeckel is a clinical speech-language pathologist at Mayo Clinic. She has worked as a clinician and independent consultant in schools, private practice, private rehabilitation agency, and clinic. She is on the professional advisory board of the Childhood Apraxia of Speech Association of North America (CASANA) and edited the curriculum for CASANA’s intensive training institute on CAS. Dr. Stoeckel has presented both nationally and internationally and has co-authored articles appearing in the Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research and Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics. 

Course Description 

Diagnosis and treatment of children with severe speech sound disorders, including CAS, can be complex and challenging in any clinical setting. This course will review recent research that informs clinical decision-making for children with CAS and severe speech sound disorders.  It will include discussion of assessment procedures, including standardized tools and dynamic assessment, and an adaptable, evidence-based approach to treatment (Dynamic Temporal and Tactile Cuing).  Interactive activities and video examples will be used.   

Learner Outcomes

  1. Interpret responses during assessment to support differential diagnosis in children with severe speech sound disorders.
  2. Describe dynamic assessment and treatment techniques for children with severe speech sound disorders.
  3. Comparemotor-based versus phonological approaches to treatment. 

Agenda

Registration: 8:00 – 8:30
Presenter: 8:30 – 10:00
Break: 10:00 – 10:15
Presenter: 10:15 – 12:00
Lunch: 12:00 – 1:30
Presenter: 1:30 – 3:00
Break: 3:00 – 3:15
Presenter: 3:15 – 4:45

Professional Level: Intermediate Professional Level

Financial Relationship: Medbridge Royalty options or ownership interest, teaching and speaking.
Relevant non-financial relationships: CASANA Professional and Board Membership

t. ukrainetzTeresa Ukrainetz, Ph.D, S-LP(C), ASHA Fellow, is Professor and SLP Division Chair in the Department of Communicative Disorders and Deaf Education at Utah State University. Dr. Ukrainetz earned her master’s degree in speech-language pathology from the University of British Columbia and worked as an SLP in a school district near Vancouver, Canada. She obtained her Ph.D. from the University of Texas at Austin and was on faculty at the University of Wyoming from 1995 to 2016. Dr. Ukrainetz’s research and scholarship pertain to the conceptual framework, procedures, and tools of school-age language intervention. She investigates how assessments and treatments intersect with contexts of use, and how to optimize these intersections so SLPs can make meaningful differences for students struggling with academic language and learning. Dr. Ukrainetz has investigated norm-referenced tests, dynamic assessment, phonemic awareness, narrative, and the role of the school SLP. Dr. Ukrainetz’s current research addresses how SLPs can use their distinctive expertise to improve comprehension and expression of expository discourse. In addition to her research reports and clinical articles, Dr. Ukrainetz has authored two books: School-age Language Intervention: Evidenced-based Practices and Contextualized Skill Intervention: Scaffolding PreK–12 Literacy Achievement. 

Course Description 

For later elementary grades and beyond, students must comprehend and learn from oral and written academic texts, and turn their ideas into essays, reports, and presentations across school subjects. To help struggling students achieve meaningful improvements in their language and learning skills, speech-language pathologists must make strategic selections of goals, procedures, and activities that fit individual learning needs and can operate within the opportunities and constraints of school service delivery. This presentation will address evidence-based intervention within the expansive domain of comprehension and expression of oral and written informational discourse. Expository structure, reading comprehension, and academic expectations will be addressed. The presentation will provide guidance on making sense of the research and implementing it in clinical practice. Recommendations will follow a contextualized skill framework, using key features of effective intervention, spoken language interactions around texts, connections to the curriculum and classroom, topical coherence to promote concepts and vocabulary, purposeful learning strategies, and facilitation of student ownership of learning. 

Learner Outcomes 

  1. Explain expository discourse and identify academic expectations across the grades 
  2. Identify expository language intervention goals and procedures that can make noticeable differences in expository language achievement. 
  3. Identify evidence-based features of intervention and translate research evidence into practice. 

Agenda 

Registration: 8:00 – 8:30 
Presenter: 8:30 – 10:00 
Break: 10:00 – 10:15 
Presenter: 10:15 – 12:00 
Lunch: 12:00 – 1:30 
Presenter: 1:30 – 3:00 
Break: 3:00 – 3:15 
Presenter: 3:15 – 4:45

Professional Level: Intermediate 

Financial Relationship: Pro-Ed royalty options or other ownership interest, other activities - book authorship. 
Relevant non-financial relationships - none.

mj cooleyMary Jo Cooley Hidecker, PhD, CCC-A/SLP is an assistant professor in the Division of Communication Disorders at the University of Wyoming. She uses the World Health Organization (WHO) ICF framework in her teaching, clinical consulting, and research. With a specialty in AAC and individuals with complex communication needs, Dr. Hidecker wants individuals using AAC to participate in life, doing their desired “stuff.” 

Course Description

Should the client’s participation be the starting and ending point of our assessment and intervention? During this seminar, I will describe advantages and challenges in beginning and ending with participation when assessing and intervening in the area of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC). 

The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) can be used as an assessment and intervention framework with a focus on participation. Through lecture, discussion, and case examples, we will explore how beginning and ending with ICF participation may change our approaches to AAC. 

Learner Outcomes

  1. Explainthe role augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) can play in participation and describe communication from an ICF activity level. 
  2. DescribeAAC assessment plans with a focus on participation. 
  3. Write participation goals for individuals using AAC.
  4. ExplainAAC intervention strategies using the ICF framework. 

Agenda

Registration: 8:00 – 8:30

Presenter: 8:30 – 10:00

Break: 10:00 – 10:15

Presenter: 10:15 – 12:00

Lunch: 12:00 – 1:30

Presenter: 1:30 – 3:00

Break: 3:00 – 3:15

Presenter: 3:15 – 4:45

Professional Level: Intermediate

Audience: speech-language pathologists, assistive technology professionals, occupational therapists, regular and special education teachers, other professionals who participate in AAC teams. 

Financial Relationship: University of Wyoming: Salary & Employment. USU Speaking Fee. 
Relevant non-financial relationships: none.

humbertDr. Ianessa Humbert is an Associate Professor at the University of Florida in the Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences. She has expertise in swallowing and swallowing disorders. Dr. Humbert’s research program is focused on the physiological mechanisms of swallowing disorders and the development of rehabilitation strategies for dysfunction. Her interests center on the peripheral and central control of swallowing in normal and impaired function. More recently, a major interest of her research program has been to understand the neural mechanisms underlying normal and disordered swallowing and how principles of motor learning can be applied to examine these as well as swallowing interventions. In this context, Dr. Humbert’s research involves neural stimulation, neural imaging, and peripheral perturbation studies of swallowing in humans. These studies focus on aspects of age-related decline and neurogenic dysphagia and how rehabilitation can be more effective when implementing skill learning and/or adaptation to perturbations.  

Dr. Humbert’s research has been steadily supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health, The American Heart Association, and The American Speech Language Hearing Association since 2006. Dr. Humbert is a widely sought after invited speaker at several regional, national, and international clinical and scientific meetings. Dr. Humbert has created online courses for CEU credit on swallowing physiology and clinical practice, for which hundreds of clinicians have registered to date and she is the author of the Swallowing Pocket Guide: A Quick Reference for Muscles and Innervation, which has sold several hundred copies nationally and internationally. 

Course Description

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 (Obamacare) is moving the health care industry towards a pay-for-performance based service delivery model.  Thus, re-admissions for dehydration, malnutrition, and aspiration pneumonia in dysphagic patients could lead to financial penalties for health care institutions.  A significant shift in practice patterns of Speech-Language Pathologists in dysphagia management is required to avoid financial penalties and limitations to our professional scope of practice.  The overall goal of this course is to close the current practice gap between pay-for-performance requirements and current dysphagia management practice.  Attendees will leave with the ability to identify objective physiologic metrics, utilize a clinical decision tree, and obtain critical talking points to advocate for resources for patients with dysphagia management.  

Learner Outcomes

  1. Identify inconsistencies in clinical decision making for traditional and emerging treatment techniques.
  2. Learn how to apply objective metric based measures to establish a diagnostic baseline and treatment gains in dysphagia management.
  3. Derive physiologically based treatments to address several of the most common challenging swallowingpathophysiologies. 
  4. Learn to create and use a physiologically guided clinical decision tree to incorporate into your everyday practice.

Agenda

schedule

Professional Level: Intermediate Professional Level

Financial Relationship:
Honoraria for Online Courses

  • Northern Speech Services – Honoraria for online e-courses
    • Dysphagia Practice: Moving Toward More Comprehensive Treatment Protocols.
    • Electrical Stimulation In The Normal And Impaired Swallow.
    • Swallowing Physiology: Understanding Its Relationship To Traditional Swallowing Treatments.
  • Medbridge – Honoraria for online e-course
    • Understanding the Events of Swallowing in Normal and Disordered Adults - An Evidence-Based Course.

Research Grant Funding

  • National Institutes of Health – Research funding
    • Applying Motor Learning Principles to Dysphagia Rehabilitation (1R01DC01428501A1)
  • American Heart Association – Research funding
    • Applying Motor Learning Principles to Dysphagia Rehabilitation after Stroke (14BGIA20380348)
  • American Speech Language Hearing Foundation
    • Creating swallowing physiologists by applying physiology to clinical decision-making

 

Non-Financial Relationships:

  • Dysphagia Research Society - Board Councilor
  • Dysphagia Research Society – Website Communications and Public Relations Committee