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Student & Program Assessment – University

Undergraduate Program Data

Undergraduate Learning Objectives

The fundamental goal that guides the COMD undergraduate program is to prepare students for graduate education. A bachelor's or second bachelor's degrees in communicative disorders and Deaf Education contains the pre-requisites for graduate programs in audiology and speech-language pathology. Each COMD course syllabus has stated learning objectives related to the recommended competencies (RC). (The undergraduate program in Deaf Education is a composite major in teacher education with Early Childhood, Elementary, Secondary, Special Education and Deaf Education.)

Students will have a broad understanding of:

RC.1 normal language development

RC1.1 Observation of normal/abnormal communication abilities related to language, hearing, and speech disorders. (COMD 2400)

RC1.2 Demonstrate knowledge of terminology, classifications, and methods in the area of language, speech and hearing development (COMD 2500)

RC1.3 Demonstrate knowledge of language development by systematically analyzing a child's language skills for MLU, and by informally estimating skills in the areas of phonology, morphology, semantics, syntax, and pragmatics. (COMD 2500)

RC1.4 Demonstrate knowledge of language growth in older children, adolescents, and adults (COMD 2500)

RC.2 language disorders and phonology

RC2.1 Identify types of communication disorders existing across the lifespan (“Big 9” language disorders recognized by ASHA) (COMD 2600)

RC2.2 Gain basic understanding of the characteristics, etiologies, and brief introduction to assessment and intervention practices related to language disorders. (COMD 2600)

RC2.3 Demonstrate basic knowledge in the fields of articulatory phonetics, descriptive phonetics, clinical phonetics and developmental phonology (COMD 3500)

RC2.4 Develop proficiency in transcription of vowels and consonants, citation forms and connected speech, diacritics in normal and disordered speech, dialects of English (COMD 3500)

RC2.5 Demonstrate the ability to assess, evaluate, analyze, and remediate impairments in the language of children ages birth through preschool including language sampling and analysis procedures, interpreting formal and informal testing, facilitating language through strategies and corresponding theories, planning clinical management and intervention, and enhancing emergent literacy(COMD 5200)

RC.3 linguistics

RC3.1 students a thorough background in morphological and syntactic analysis in English. (Morphology, Parts of Speech, Sentence Structure, Sentence types, Developmental norms) (5100)
RC3.2 Analyzing words into component parts (5100) RC3.3 Displaying sentences in Reed-Kellog diagrams and Transformational tree diagrams (5100)
RC3.4 Graphically displaying sentence constituents and he relationships among dependent and independent clauses (5100)

RC3.5 Translating schematic diagrams into prose discussion (5100)

RC.4 anatomy of hearing and speech mechanisms

RC4.1 Demonstrate foundational knowledge of the anatomy of the human
communication system (3100)

RC4.2 identify the structural components of the various sub-processes of the communicative act; i.e. respiration, phonation, resonation, articulation, neuro-processes and embryological development (3100)

RC4.3 Identify the anatomy of the ear and the primary hearing and balance functions of the ear (3400)

RC4.4 identify and explain the clinical measurement of perception and production characteristics of the respiratory, laryngeal, articulatory, resonatory, and auditory system events (5070)

RC4.5 demonstrate knowledge of basic human communication and swallowing processes, including their biological, eurological, acoustic, psychological, developmental, and linguistic and cultural bases (5070)

RC.5 introduction to audiology

RC5.1 Identify the principles of acoustics as they relate to human hearing. Include an understanding of how physics, anatomy and physiology interact to produce auditory perception (3400)

RC5.2 of pure tone audiometry (including clinical masking ), speech audiometry, clinical immittance measures and disorders of the outer, middle and inner ear (3700)

RC5.3 describe the profession of audiology to include various settings where audiologists work (3700)

RC5.4 describe how sound is propagated through the human auditory system (3700)

RC5.5 perform simple basic audiometric measurements (3700)

RC5.6 differentiate common hearing related disorders based on audiogram configurations (3700)

RC5.7 explain treatment options for people with hearing loss to aid them in Communication (5330)

RC5.8 Describe the basic options in amplification devices available for persons with hearing loss and knowledge of function (5330)

Undergraduate Assessment Plan/Process

All students in the department of Communicative Disorders and Deaf Education complete formative and summative assessments as part of each course offering. Generally, faculty meetings are held each year in which discussions are held regarding course quality, instructional methods and curriculum needs. Faculty review learning goals for each program and course coverage. A comprehensive undergraduate curriculum review is scheduled for 2017. Graduation data on the number of bachelor's, master’s and doctoral degree recipients and program completion rates for the department are available through the Registrar's Office annually.

The department of Communicative Disorders and Deaf Education in the Emma Eccles Jones College of Education and Human Services is committed to advancing the awareness and knowledge of normal and disordered processes of communication, as well as the clinical and educational practices that effectively meet the communication and academic needs of children and adults with communication differences and disorders. The priorities of the department are guided by our mission statement and accreditation recommendations. The program participates in assessment activities to ensure our mission is accomplished.

Student Performance

Across degree programs, student performance is measured through:

  • Objective Tests: Tests measure students' acquisition of factual knowledge and rudimentary application of concepts and skills. Examples of objective tests include multiple choice, short answer, and essay tests.
  • Authentic Application Assignments: Class assignments are given for students to demonstrate knowledge and skills required in professional settings. Examples of application assignments include case presentations, sign language competency assignments, assistive technology demonstrations, and evidence-based practice summaries.
  • Clinical Observations/Evaluations: Evaluations of students' clinical or teaching performance are completed by clinical supervisors or student-teaching supervisors, in on-campus and off-campus sites. Supervisors rate students on their acquisition and demonstration of the specific knowledge and skills required in practicum settings, developed in alignment with professional accreditation standards, where applicable.

Course Evaluation

The foundation of a strong program is faculty/instructional staff who are qualified, competent, and sufficient in number to provide excellent academic and clinical preparation. Each instructor and course are evaluated by students every semester. Teacher/Course Evaluations are available to the public.

ASHA - Recommended Course Topics
Year # of UG courses focus: Normal Language Development # of UG courses focus: Language Disorders & Phonology # of UG courses focus: Linguistics # of UG courses focus: A&P of Hearing & Speech Mechanism # of UG courses focus: Intro to Audiology Objective Met (yes/no) Average
2015-16 17 9 4 8 5 yes 6.4
2014-15 16 9 4 7 4 yes 6
2013-14 15 9 4 7 4 yes 6
2012-13 15 9 4 7 4 yes 6
2011-12 15 9 4 7 4 yes 6
Overall % 6.1

 

Student assessments are embedded within each course.
  C.1 Normal Language Development C.2 Language Disorders & Phonology C.3 Linguistics C.4 A&P of Hearing & Speech Mechanisms C.5 Intro to Audiology
COMD 2400 - Orientation & Observation x x x x x
COMD 2500- Language, Speech & Hearing Development x x      
COMD 2600- Intro to COMD   x      
COMD 3100- Fundamentals of Anatomy for Speech & Language       x  
COMD 3120- Disorders of Articulation & Phonology   x      
COMD 3400- Acoustics and Anatomy of Ear       x x
COMD 3500 Phonetics/Developmental Phonology   x x    
COMD 3700- Basic Audiology         x
COMD 5070- Speech Science x x x x x
COMD 5100- Language Science   x x    
COMD 5200- Language Assessment & Intervention for Children Birth to Age Five x x      
COMD 5210- Cultural & Linguistic Diversity in COMD     x    
COMD 5330- Aural Rehab         x

Outcome Data

The outcome data of student learning objectives for a COMDDE degree is comprised of the following assessment methods:

STUDENT PERFORMANCE/OUTCOMES
Across degree programs, student performance is measured through:

Course Based Objective Tests: Tests measure students' acquisition of factual knowledge and rudimentary application of concepts and skills. Examples of objective tests include multiple choice, short answer, and essay tests. 2011-2016 Grade Report

Authentic Application Assignments: Class assignments are given for students to demonstrate knowledge and skills required in professional settings. Examples of application assignments include case presentations, sign language competency assignments, assistive technology demonstrations, and evidence-based practice summaries. Course embedded assessments

Course Embedded Assessments: (example insert writing rubric sample)

Graduation of USU COMD students from US graduate programs.

Target 40 graduate schools accept and/or graduate our campus/distance undergraduate students.

Number Grad Schools Graduating USU COMD Undergraduate Students
Year (Fall,Spring, Summer) Count
2014-2015 100
2013-2014 67

Measured by: Clearinghouse data of graduation from ASHA-accredited graduate schools

Source of Data: Clearinghouse annual report with names of graduate schools graduating COMD students who have attended or graduated from our undergraduate program.

Data-Based Decisions

The department of COMDDE has made changes to required curriculum and clinic based upon student and faculty evaluations.  Formative and summative evaluations and the data based decisions are documented as part of the ASHA accreditation report for both Audiology and Speech-language Pathology.

Changes to Deaf Education curriculum have been made based survey responses and faculty observations.   During the faculty administered ASL proficiency exam, weakness in student performance in regard to classifiers, text analysis concept mapping were observed year-to-year.   It was noted that students needed additional instruction and practice.  As a result, effective 2016, the content  from  COMD 4910 - ASL III  Academic Use of ASL, was moved to COMD 5620 Teaching School Subjects.  ASL III now includes further instruction in preparation for COMD 5620.

Effective 2016, as a result of student/alumni surveys,  two special education courses were added to the Deaf Ed curriculum (SPED 5010 5040).  Respondents expressed a concern that they needed more information on classroom management and working with students with disabilities.  Additional content on  classroom management was added to COMD 6850, and 6650.

Graduate Program Data

Graduate Learning Objectives

The following knowledge and skills are assessed, and requirements met in the appropriate discipline, in order to be eligible for national certification. Standards cited refer to ASHA references for SLP and AuD.

Audiology

Students will demonstrate prerequisite skills and knowledge of life sciences, physical sciences, behavioral sciences, and mathematics; knowledge and understanding of the foundations of clinical practice in audiology. In addition, they will have:

  • completed a course of study that addresses the knowledge and skills necessary to independently practice in the profession of audiology. (Std. I)
  • been granted a graduate degree from a program accredited by the Council on Academic Accreditation in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology (CAA). (Std. II)
  • completed a course of study that includ-s academic course work and a minimum of 1,820 hours of supervised clinical practicum sufficient in depth and breadth to achieve the knowledge and skills outcomes stipulated in Standard IV.
  • been supervised by individuals who held the ASHA Certificate of Clinical Competence (CCC) in Audiology. (Std. III)
  • demonstrated knowledge and skills delineated in Foundations of Practice, Prevention and Identification, Assessment, Intervention, Advocacy/Consultation, and Education/Research/Administration (Std. IV A-F)
  • met the education program’s requirements for demonstrating satisfactory performance through ongoing formative assessment of knowledge and skills. (Std. V-A)

Speech-Language Pathology

Upon successful completion of the Master’s Degree Program students will have:

  • demonstrated knowledge of the biological sciences, physical sciences, statistics, and the social/behavioral sciences. (CFCC Standard IV-A)
  • demonstrated knowledge of basic human communication and swallowing processes, including the appropriate biological, neurological, acoustic, psychological, developmental, and linguistic and cultural bases. The applicant will have demonstrated the ability to integrate information pertaining to normal and abnormal human development across the life span. (CFCC Standard IV-B)
  • demonstrated knowledge of communication and swallowing disorders and differences, including the appropriate etiologies, characteristics, anatomical/physiological, acoustic, psychological, developmental, and linguistic and cultural correlates in the nine areas noted in the standard. (Standard IV-C)
  • demonstrated current knowledge of the principles and methods of prevention, assessment, and intervention for people with communication and swallowing disorders, including consideration of anatomical/physiological, psychological, developmental, and linguistic and cultural correlates. (Standard IV-D)
  • demonstrated knowledge of standards of ethical conduct. (Standard IV-E)
  • demonstrated knowledge of processes used in research and of the integration of research principles into evidence-based clinical practice. (Standard IV-F)
  • demonstrated knowledge of contemporary professional issues. (Standard IV-G)
  • demonstrated knowledge of entry level and advanced certifications, licensure, and other relevant professional credentials, as well as local, state, and national regulations and policies relevant to professional practice. (Standard IV-H)
  • demonstrated skills in oral and written or other forms of communication sufficient for entry into professional practice. (Standard V-A)
  • completed program of study that included experiences sufficient in breadth and depth to achieve skills outcomes across evaluation, intervention, interaction and personal qualities (Standard V-B)
  • completed a minimum of 400 clock hours of supervised clinical experience in the practice of speech-language pathology. Twenty-five hours must have been spent in clinical observation, and 375 hours must be spent in direct client/patient contact. (Standard V-C)
  • completed at least 325 of the 400 clock hours while the applicant is engaged in graduate study in a program accredited in speech-language pathology by the Council on Academic Accreditation in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology. (Standard V-D)
  • been supervised by individuals who hold the Certificate of Clinical Competence in the appropriate profession. The amount of direct supervision must have been commensurate with the student's knowledge, skills, and experience, must not be less than 25% of the student's total contact with each client/patient, and must take place periodically throughout the practicum. Supervision must have been sufficient to ensure the welfare of the client/patient. (Standard V-E)
  • participated in supervised practicum that included experience with client/patient populations across the life span and from culturally/linguistically diverse backgrounds. Practicum must have included experience with client/patient populations with various types and severities of communication and/or related disorders, differences, and disabilities. (Standard V-F)

Deaf Education

Bilingual-Bicultural Track
At the conclusion of the academic program in Deaf Education (Bilingual-Bicultural), students will be able to:

  • perform as a classroom teacher of deaf children, and possess the requisite pedagogical skills to ensure that their teaching is effective and appropriate
  • demonstrate excellent expressive and receptive skills in American Sign Language
  • demonstrate appropriate use of American Sign Language in teaching literacy skills in English
  • infuse unique Deaf cultural information into the classroom setting
  • foster identity and pride in the student who is deaf
  • understand the research, literature, and best practices related to teaching the child who is deaf
  • possess English as a second language and American Sign Language competencies in relation to literacy development
  • understand how diagnostic information can be used in developing appropriate teaching strategies for the deaf child
  • work closely with other professionals in developing and implementing plans for educating the deaf child.
  • be knowledgeable of the laws that impact the deaf child
  • understand and facilitate the development of an Individualized Education Plan (IEP)
  • select, use, and troubleshoot appropriate amplification systems for the deaf and hard of hearing
  • understand the necessity of early identification of children who are deaf or hard of hearing, and the educational and placement options available for parents
  • explain the major problems and issues involved in education of the deaf and hard of hearing and strategies for dealing with these issues
  • describe the history of Deaf Education in the United States and its impact on the present status of Deaf Education

Graduate Assessment Plan/Process

Department divisions review learning goals for the program and coverage across courses. Multiple faculty meetings are held each year in which discussions are held regarding course quality, instructional methods, and curriculum needs.

All students in the department of Communicative Disorders and Deaf Education complete formative and summative assessments as part of each course offering. Graduation data on the number of bachelor's and master’s degree recipients and program completion rates for the department are available through the Registrar's Office annually.

Student Performance

Course-based Objective Tests: Tests measure students' acquisition of factual knowledge and rudimentary application of concepts and skills. Examples of objective tests include multiple choice, short answer, and essay tests.
Course-based Authentic Application Assignments: Class assignments are given for students to demonstrate knowledge and skills required in professional settings. Examples of application assignments include case presentations, sign language competency assignments, assistive technology demonstrations, and evidence-based practice summaries.
Clinical and Teaching Observations/Evaluations: Evaluations of students' clinical and teaching performance are completed by clinical supervisors or student-teaching supervisors, in on-campus and off-campus sites. Supervisors rate students on their acquisition and demonstration of the specific knowledge and skills required in practicum settings, developed in alignment with professional accreditation standards, where applicable. Prior to beginning externships and for program completion, each student must demonstrate competence in the clinical setting.

AUD – Students successfully complete clinical practica in every academic semester of their graduate program to gain the skills and associated competencies required for clinical certification. (COMD 7200,7300,7400)
SLP – Students successfully complete clinical practica in every academic semester of their graduate program in the campus clinic or in medical and educational externships (COMD 6100, 6200, 6300). By the end of the program, students must demonstrate competence to gain the skills and associated competencies required for clinical certification.

DeafEd – Students successfully complete clinical practica before student teaching. (COMD 6800)

National Standardized Tests: The Praxis examinations in audiology and speech-language pathology (https://www.ets.org/praxis/asha) assess beginning practitioners' understanding of essential content and current practices. For Deaf Education, the Praxis® test, 5001, measures teacher candidates’ knowledge and skills. The tests are used for licensing and certification processes and include subject-specific content knowledge, with a focus on specialized content knowledge used in K–12 teaching.

Employment Rate After Graduation: The employment rate is also examined for evidence of program effectiveness across the three divisions.

Course Evaluations 

The foundation of a strong program is faculty/instructional staff who are qualified, competent, and sufficient in number to provide excellent academic and clinical preparation. Each instructor and course are evaluated by students every semester. Teacher/Course Evaluations

Outcome Data

The student outcome data of student learning objectives for a COMDDE degree is comprised of the following assessment methods:

STUDENT PERFORMANCE

Across degree programs, student performance is measured through:

Course-based Objective Tests: 2011-2016 Grade Report
Course Based Authentic Application Assignments
Clinical Observations/Evaluations

Prior to beginning externships and for program completion, each student must demonstrate competence in their respected areas
AUD Clinic Practicum courses (COMD 7200,7300,7400) & AuD core clinical skill
SLP Clinic Practicum courses (COMD 6100) & core clinical skills/areas
Deaf Ed Teaching Practicum (COMD 6800)

National Standardized Tests

Audiology & SLP
Deaf Education
See Student Achievement Data – ASHA/CAA

Employment Rate After Graduation

Audiology & SLP
Deaf Education
See Student Achievement Data – ASHA/CAA

Data-Based Decisions

The department of COMDDE has made changes to required curriculum and clinic based upon student and faculty evaluations. Formative and summative evaluations and the data based decisions are documented as part of the ASHA accreditation report for both Audiology and Speech-language Pathology.

Changes to Deaf Education curriculum have been made based survey responses and faculty observations. During the faculty administered ASL proficiency exam, weakness in student performance in regard to classifiers, text analysis concept mapping were observed year-to-year. It was noted that students needed additional instruction and practice. As a result, effective 2016, the content from COMD 4910 - ASL III Academic Use of ASL, was moved to COMD 5620 Teaching School Subjects. ASL III now includes further instruction in preparation for COMD 5620.

Effective 2016, as a result of student/alumni surveys, two special education courses were added to the Deaf Ed curriculum (SPED 5010 5040). Respondents expressed a concern that they needed more information on classroom management and working with students with disabilities. Additional content on classroom management was added to COMD 6850, and 6650.