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Human Interaction Lab

Stephanie Borrie

Director: Stephanie Borrie, Ph.D.

Welcome to the Human Interaction Lab.  Communication requires dialogue partners to produce and perceive speech, and to coordinate these behaviors to succeed. What happens when the ability to produce or perceive speech is impaired? And how does this disrupt the natural process of conversation. In this lab, we explore how speech disorders (e.g., dysarthria) interfere with speech production, speech perception, and conversational entrainment (interpersonal coordination). We consider breakdowns in human interaction as an entity of the dialogue pair and investigate novel approaches to identify and rehabilitate such deficits. This work emphasizes the role of rhythm in communication and draws from a breadth of disciplines including speech science, cognitive science, psychology, sociolinguistics, and tools from the field of engineering. Work in the Human Interaction Lab is currently funded by the National Institute of Health.


Publications   www.humaninteractionlab.com

Borrie, S.A. and Delfino, C. (in press). Conversational entrainment of vocal fry in young adult female American English speakers. Journal of Voice.

Muñoz, K., Ong, C., Borrie, S.A., Nelson, L.H., and Twohig, M. (in press). Audiologists’ communication behavior during hearing device management appointments. International Journal of Audiology.

Borrie, S.A., Lansford, K.L. and Barrett, T.S. (in press). Rhythm perception and its role in recognition and learning of dysrhythmic speech. Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research.

Bent, T., Baese-Berk, M., Borrie, S.A., and McKee, M. (2016). Individual differences in the perception of unfamiliar regional, nonnative, and disordered speech varieties. The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 140, 3775-3786. 

Lansford, K.L., Borrie, S.A., and Bystricky, L. (2016). Use of crowdsourcing to assess the ecological validity of perceptual training paradigms in dysarthria. American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, 25, 233-239.

Borrie, S.A. and Schäfer, M.C.M. (2015). The role of somatosensory information in speech perception: Imitation improves recognition of disordered speech. Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 58,1708–1716. 

Borrie, S.A., Lubold, N., and Pon-Barry, H. (2015). Disordered speech disrupts conversational entrainment: A study of acoustic-prosodic entrainment and communicative success in populations with communication challenges. Frontiers in Psychology. 6:1187.

Borrie, S.A. (2015). Visual information: A help or hindrance to perceptual processing of dysarthric speech. The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America. 137, 1473-1480.

Borrie, S.A. and Liss, J.M. (2014). Rhythm as a coordinating device: Entrainment with disordered speech. Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 57, 815-824. 

Borrie, S.A., McAuliffe, M.J., Liss, J.M., O’Beirne, G.A., and Anderson, T. (2013). The role of linguistic and indexical information in improved recognition of dysarthric speech. The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 133, 474-482.

Borrie, S.A., McAuliffe, M.J., Liss, J.M., Kirk, C., O'Beirne, G.A., and Anderson, T. (2012). Familiarisation conditions and the mechanisms that underlie improved recognition of dysarthric speech. Language & Cognitive Processes, 27, 1039-1055.

Borrie, S.A., McAuliffe, M.J., Liss, J.M., O'Beirne, G.A., and Anderson, T. (2012). A follow-up investigation into the mechanisms that underlie improved recognition of dysarthric speech. The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 132, EL102-EL108.

Borrie, S.A., McAuliffe, M.J., and Liss, J.M. (2012). Perceptual learning of dysarthric speech: A review of experimental studies. Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 55, 290-305. 

McAuliffe, M.J., Borrie, S.A., Good, P.V., and Hughes, L.E. (2010). Consideration of the listener in the assessment and treatment of dysarthria. ACQuiring Knowledge in Speech, Language, and Hearing, 12, 16-19.  

Borrie, S.A, McAuliffe, M.J., Tillard, G., Ormond, T., Anderson, T., and Hornibrook, J. (2007). Effect of the Lee Silverman Voice Treatment (LSVT®) on articulation in speakers with Parkinson’s disease. New Zealand Journal of Speech-Language Therapy, 62, 29-36.